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Winter 2022
Julie Green: New Drawings 2020-22
Autumn 2022 - from Private collections
Summer 2021-2022
Explore - Sydney Contemporary Online 2021
Spring 2021
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Early Works – Tim Johnson 1969-1998
Summer 2020
Robert Klippel on Paper, 1950-1963
Winter 2020
Summer 2019
Michael Johnson, Dance of Line 1979
Spring 2019
Winter 2019
Tiwi, Wigram and Elcho Island Art from the Laverty Collection
Carl Plate, The Last Show He Never Had 1971-1976
Summer 2018
Poetically Microscopic from the Estate of Robert Klippel
Spring 2018
Liane Rossler - inside. outside. upsidedown.
Fred Cress Full Circle: Paintings and works on paper 1965-2009
Winter 2018
Michael Johnson 2013-2016
Other Worlds
Summer 2017
Carl Plate - Hard Colour: Paris Works 1970-1971
Michael Johnson 1968-1978
Winter 2017
Masters of Australian Photography - A Private collection
Autumn 2017 - Part II
Autumn 2017
Sweet Nature
Louise Hearman
Winter 2016
Autumn 2016
Spring 2015
Michael Johnson Diagonal Light - Works from 1980-1986
A Private Collection 2
Winter 2015
Shelfie - Liane Rossler
A Private Collection - Gary Sands
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Michael Johnson London-Sydney-New York 1960s & 1970s
Contemporary History 1974-2009
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Fairweather, Williams and others
Winter 2010
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BIG NAMES little sculptures


Michael Johnson
Two Decades
Three Cities
Vault magazine

Julie Green: New Drawings 2020-22

20 April - 7 May 2022

Show exhibition essay

Gilgamesh
New drawings by Julie Green 2020-22
accompanied by The Buried Book realised and produced by Nicholas Pounder at Polar Bear Press  

Here, on the walls, and in the book - put together with Nicholas Pounder - Julie Green, brings the resoundingly human story of Gilgamesh to the cultural imagination of the present. In gouache, ink, chalk pastel, oil paint (even botanical matter) the artist vividly responds to the oldest poem in the world, the first road trip, twenty centuries before Homer.   Artists and poets have, since amateur archeologist George Smith (1840-1876) found the clay tablets and deciphered the wedge-shaped marks in Mesopotamia (present day Iraq and Syria), have vibrated to the fable about death and friendship that is the Epic of Gilgamesh and his buddy Enkidu, the proto-Neal Cassady.

Not Egypt, not Greece, not Rome, but Sumeria with its human-headed lions, winged bulls, and ziggurats, provides the backdrop for this first written story in the history of literature. A complex and terrifying world not unlike our current cultural moment. I suspect we carry the same genes as our Babylonian ancestors, whose shrewd eyes and special intelligence was a means of survival in a hostile world. While we encounter strangeness, and otherness here, there is much that we can relate to in terms of friendship and romance, fear and vanity.

Two-thirds god, one-third man, Gilgamesh goes through a series of quests and trials, with his best friend and savage second self, Enkidu. Along the way they slaughter the ogre in the Cedar Forest, meet goddesses, draw down constellations (Taurus, the bull of heaven), all in the futile quest to conquer immortality. Enkidu dies, and Gilgamesh fails to bring him back from the underworld. Checkmate this way, checkmate that. Gilgamesh cannot overcome death. He even loses the magic plant of rejuvenation. At the end of the journey he must accept his mortal limitations and face the horror of death. That’s the take-home of this ancient epic.

For Julie Green, painting is a vividly material thing. And there is no linear recounting of the Gilgamesh story, but a visceral response to some of the episodes, passages and images. A kind of listening, or tunnelling to some inner place of reading.

The processes of composing and decomposing forms go “back to back” in Green’s words, and the layering and tearing of fragments conjures that world of ancient forests, animal spirits, sacred mountains, spring tides, waning moons. In electrifying colours Julie Green builds her pictures: bold, intense morphogenic movements out of sharply textured shapes. On oil painting paper, or linen, even silk, the painter creates fractal effects out of unstable mottled surfaces, like fish scales rippled by light, or dappled lime-green and olive forests. Ghosts of Ian Fairweather and Brett Whiteley passing through bead curtains of Pollock drips.

In one huge work a boat or iris shape is strung with delicately rendered netting. Follow the filament to each knotting point, each loop preventing the next loop from disentangling, the loop loosened and slipped along the rope; the knot feeding the filament through a pattern. It is very bewitching.

A great project assembled from the scattered fragments of a story that belongs to the roots of all our common poetries. Julie Green metabolizes these experiences and mysteries in painted works that repay attention, and that make you be and know and grow and intensify your sensuality.   

George Alexander 
31 March 2022

Julie Green

Urshanabi and the waters of death 2020

SOLD

Julie Green

Siduri 2020-2021

Julie Green

Ragmu 2021

SOLD

Julie Green

Untitled 2022

SOLD

Julie Green

Meeting of Heabani and Shamhat 2020-2022

Julie Green

Seabed and boxthorn 2021

Julie Green

Death of Humbaba 2021

Julie Green

Untitled 2019-2020

SOLD

Julie Green

Index 2019-2021

Julie Green

Kaspu 2021

SOLD

Julie Green

Scorpion men and the Desert of Mas 2021

Julie Green

Untitled 2019-2020

Julie Green

Untitled 2018-2020

SOLD

Julie Green

Meaty beaty big and bouncy 2018-2019

SOLD

Julie Green

Untitled 2019

SOLD

Julie Green and Nicholas Pounder

The Buried Book - Artist Book 2022